tastefullyoffensive:

The Chamber of Wonder [buttersafe]

chillvibes:

thedappertomato:

socially-awkward-platypus:

The composition is so amazing, especially the faux skirt-twirling.

This is beautiful

absolutely fantastic work
chillvibes:

thedappertomato:

socially-awkward-platypus:

The composition is so amazing, especially the faux skirt-twirling.

This is beautiful

absolutely fantastic work
chillvibes:

thedappertomato:

socially-awkward-platypus:

The composition is so amazing, especially the faux skirt-twirling.

This is beautiful

absolutely fantastic work

chillvibes:

thedappertomato:

socially-awkward-platypus:

The composition is so amazing, especially the faux skirt-twirling.

This is beautiful

absolutely fantastic work

lucithor:

WHY WAS I UNAWARE OF THE FACT THAT “DISGRUNTLED” IS, IN FACT, THE OPPOSITE OF “GRUNTLED”

image

WHY DOES NOBODY USE THIS WORD

coffeekaling:

this cool video I made in my car is so pretty

typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:
typostrate:

Ceramic Typography
We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.
"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.
At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!
Follow Typostrate on:

typostrate:

Ceramic Typography

We have seen a lot of typography objects in our daily life, but this time we spotted something new. The work of Stephanie de Armond designer and cermaic specialist from Minneapolis, USA. Her work explores language – taking slang phrases, colloquialisms, and snippets of conversation and abstracting them into sculptural form where meanings are revealed and obscured through typography and letterforms.

"Stephanie makes ceramic sculpture and installations that combine the honesty of traditional craft and its methods with a sly humor that places her work in a thorughly contemporary context. Her use of text and illustration betrays an often macabre sense of reality that suggests mundanity may be aggression in disguise.” Diana Kim.

At some point her attraction for typography combined with music switched into a deeper frame thinking within typographic forms. So she began experimenting with lids referencing a letterform and several objects getting to a sentence. Inspired by Jenny Holzer and her work with sentences as objects she came to the idea creating ceramics with type. WAtch the results!

Follow Typostrate on: typostrate on facebook typostrate on twitter typostrate on pinterest typostrate on google plus typostrate rss

blueberrymodern:

henry varnum poor’s studio - photo by leslie williamson

olisaurusrex:

the Jesus aesthetic is in this year

and it looks better on you than anyone else
olisaurusrex:

the Jesus aesthetic is in this year

and it looks better on you than anyone else
olisaurusrex:

the Jesus aesthetic is in this year

and it looks better on you than anyone else
olisaurusrex:

the Jesus aesthetic is in this year

and it looks better on you than anyone else

olisaurusrex:

the Jesus aesthetic is in this year

and it looks better on you than anyone else

nycartscene:

Opens April 11:“Submerged Motherlands” Swoon Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYCBrooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago. photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq
nycartscene:

Opens April 11:“Submerged Motherlands” Swoon Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYCBrooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago. photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq
nycartscene:

Opens April 11:“Submerged Motherlands” Swoon Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYCBrooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago. photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq
nycartscene:

Opens April 11:“Submerged Motherlands” Swoon Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYCBrooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago. photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

nycartscene:

Opens April 11:

Submerged Motherlands
 Swoon
 
Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NYC

Brooklyn-based artist Swoon creates a site-specific installation in Brooklyn Museum’s rotunda gallery, transforming it into a fantastic landscape centering on a monumental sculptural tree with a constructed environment at its base, including sculpted boats and rafts, figurative prints and drawings, and cut paper foliage. Often inspired by contemporary and historical events, Swoon engages with climate change in the installation as a response to the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy that struck the Atlantic Coast in 2012, and Doggerland, a landmass that once connected Great Britain and Europe and that was destroyed by a tsunami 8,000 years ago.

photos from Swoon’s instagram.com/swoonhq

totallytransparent:

Transparent Train Windows
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